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Announcing the Final Projects for the Digital Seed Grants 2021-2022

Announcing the Final Projects for the Digital Seed Grants 2021-2022

The Digital Seed Grant (dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant) had impressive applications for its fifth year (award period 2021-2022), which initially launched in 2016 for the award period of 2017-2018. The Digital Seed Grant Review Committee and Library Dean decided to award three grants for the 2021-2022 academic year. The AY 21-22 awardees were announced on the website at https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant21-22.

Below is a summary of the three winning projects and resulting outcomes. A PDF copy of the full report details is preserved in the institutional repository.

 

Revisiting the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) with Computerized Linguistic Analysis

Primary Investigator (PI):  Cindi Brown, graduate student in the Department of Psychology

PI’s Project Description: The purpose of our project was to locate narrative responses to the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), a projective assessment that played an important role in the history of psychology, and then archive these narratives, transcribe them to a digital format, and make them available for interested researchers who wish to apply modern interpretive techniques. The research also explored using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software to interpret these narratives. Developed by Dr. Henry Murray in the 1930's, the TAT was used extensively by psychologists between the 1930s and the 1970s. Given that the TAT has been administered extensively for decades, many TAT narratives are in existence. Some of these have been previously published in books or on the internet, and others can be found in the papers and records of clinicians and researchers, some of which are included in larger collections, such as the History of Psychology Archives at the University of Akron or the Murray Research Archive Dataverse at Harvard. However, prior to our efforts, no comprehensive collection of TAT narratives from these multiple sources had ever been archived in a convenient repository for researchers, teachers, and students to access.

The Digital Seed Grant has enabled us to take on this important task by providing funding for LIWC software and for a research assistant to help locate, transcribe, and organize TAT narratives. Additionally, the MTSU Walker Library hosts the published archive in the institutional repository (JEWLScholar). At present, the archive contains 665 TAT narratives, collected from 303 subjects. Additional narratives have been collected, but not yet added to the archive. It is our hope to update the archive with these additional narratives in the summer of 2023.

Purpose and Audience: This grant enabled the creation of the TAT Archive, a resource beneficial to psychology researchers, teachers, and students It is our hope that the archive will be used extensively, both in research and in the classroom. Two studies using the archived data are already planned by the research team. The first of these studies is an exploration of whether or not computerized linguistic analysis can yield useful interpretations of projective tests. In order to explore this question, the researchers will utilize the TAT narratives from the archive. Each narrative will be interpreted using Dr. Henry Murray’s original guidelines and again with the aid LIWC software. A comparison of the results of the two interpretive schemas should yield interesting insights. The second project involves comparing the narratives generated by males with those generated by females, in order to explore gendered differences in language use.

Project News: The TAT Archive was published online on August 10, 2022. Visit: https://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/handle/mtsu/6767. The archive describes the development and contents of the archived narratives through an Archive Overview and the Narrative Collection (dataset).

screenshot of TAT archive

 

Voices From the Amazon: Translating Three Brazilian Films

Primary Investigator (PI):  Professor Paul Chilsen, MTSU Department of Media Arts

PI’s Project Description: The Digital Seed Grant was used to fund translations of three films produced. These short films were shot in native languages of the Brazilian Amazon. Some of the projects are in an Indigenous language and others are in Portuguese. Because of the nature of the projects, the nature of the languages, and owing to the lack of travel because of the pandemic, I pursued new remote strategies to get the texts for these films translated into English, and in some cases, from English to Portuguese. I applied for a Digital Seed Grant to support the remote translation work, collaborating with colleagues in the Amazon and here in the U.S.

From process to product, these films are developed within an organic, evolving process of multifaceted international collaboration, maintaining cultural authenticity and contextual continuity through the stories being told. The translated films will make them more broadly available and accessible to a larger audience. Of course, there is also the interim critical step, where the translations are used to help edit the films correctly. The original intent was to work side-by-side on translations with individuals in Brazil, hashing out what was said by interviewees, etc. and then piecing together rough edits in the field, to be refined later. When Covid disallowed regular travel for some time, in that void, I started working on alternative pathways to complete these films, including working with individuals remotely to complete the translations. I requested financial support for the remote translation work, collaborating with colleagues in the Amazon and here in the United States. The methodology varies depending on each situation, but generally involves sending clips and transcripts back-and-forth to known individuals, who then provide translations over several exchanges. This is a laborious, time-consuming task and translations are still in process.

Purpose and Audience: Once the films are completed, I plan to release them to as broad an audience as possible. I will enter them in international film festivals for the first year after their completion. After that, I will work with educational distributors and libraries to distribute and share the works to their furthest potential. All of these projects will also be used in academic settings, here at our university and in classrooms and conferences around the world.

This group of projects, and my work in the Brazilian Amazon in general, is a central component of my current research and creative work. Additionally, these films have been completed as an adjunct component to an MTSU International Signature Program in the Brazilian Amazon. The student component adds an important educational aspect to the creation of these films, offering students unprecedented access and experience to advanced, international coproduction. This is an important benefit to our department, college, and university, while offering one of the few truly interdisciplinary experiences for students at MTSU.  The program and the projects also draw students from other universities and walks of life, bringing a good number of students to MTSU who would not otherwise be involved with our university.

Project News: The PI took three College of Media and Entertainment students to Brazil over the summer to shoot a documentary film. The three films are tentatively scheduled for release over the next year 2022-2023, with staggered releases as they finish. Check back for updates at https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant21-22projects.

 

image for film project

 

Tissue Culture of American Ginseng

Primary Investigator (PI):  Ethan Swiggart, MTSU Department of Agriculture

PI’s Project Description: The goal of this project was to increase the understanding of the American ginseng (panax quinquefolius) seed germination and emergence. Seeds from American ginseng have double dormancy, meaning they require two years (18 months) to begin the germination process. Seeds require two winters at very cold temperatures, known as cold stratification, and will germinate in the spring. They are quite small, around 6 cm and very difficult to see. The resulting output of the grant was the creation of a timelapse video, showing the emergence of American ginseng and illuminates another interesting fact about the elusive plant: American ginseng has hypogeous germination! This is a somewhat rare occurrence where the cotyledon (seed leaves) remains underground. The hypocotyl (stem) is quite short, and the cotyledons force the radicle and epicotyl to elongate. This results in the plant producing true leaves capable of photosynthesis right from the time of emergence.

The Digital Seed Grant enabled the purchase and equipment loan of GoPros, tripods, microphone, and memory cards to create educational videos about the ginseng plant. Additionally, the MTSU Walker Library hosts the published video in the institutional repository (JEWLScholar).

Purpose and Audience: Because it takes 18 months just to start the germination process, this video will aid viewers in understanding the time and effort it takes to produce an American Ginseng plant. This adds to the understanding of why the cost of the root and root products is often quite expensive. Conserving American Ginseng remains an uphill battle, understanding how long these processes take will increase the public’s understanding of the difficulty of the task.

The video will later be uploaded to the International Ginseng Institute’s webpage for our regional growers and enthusiasts to view. It will also be used in BIO 1110 and Plant and Soil Science classes as a unique visual aid at MTSU. It will be possible to use this video to also spark discussions on growth requirements (shady and cool) soil composition (well drained and high in calcium) as well as its cultural significance.

Project News: The one-minute video showing the time-lapse for American ginseng seed germination and emergence is downloadable from at https://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/handle/mtsu/6770 (82 MB). Plays with time-lapse images, background music, and text annotation of growth description.

 

Screenshot of Ginseng project in repository

 

Funding and Support

The Digital Seed Grant is made possible by generous funding and support from the Library Dean and the Digital Scholarship Initiatives team. For many, this is a starter grant, which can lead to national grant opportunities in the future and Walker Library wants to encourage and support such creativity activity.

As a competitive grant, evaluation of applications and assessment of digital lifecycles of selected projects takes time. The Digital Seed Grant is indebted to the time of the Review Committee, comprised of digital project experts from Walker Library and the Digital Partners (a rotating member from the Department of History, Center for Historic Preservation, Center for Popular Music, Albert Gore Research Center, and the University Archives). The Walker Library also thanks those that help promote the grant and encourage participation. Since 2017, the library has jumped-started campus research by funding 15 digital seed grant projects across various academic disciplines.

The 2022-2023 call for proposals closed, and those projects are running from July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2022. As those projects are completed, the following website will be updated: https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant22-23.

For more information on the Digital Seed Grant and access the application, visit https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant.

Posted on 9/16/2022

 

Digital Seed Grants 2022-2023 Awarded

Digital Seed Grants 2022-2023 Awarded

Over summer 2022, the Digital Seed Grant Committee received applications for its sixth year of awarding Digital Seed Grants. The proposals received were of high quality despite the impact of Covid-19, and Walker Library is committed to keeping the library’s charge of accelerating teaching and research with digital technologies and methodologies. One way the library does this is by funding seed grants.

The Digital Seed Grant Committee was exited to receive 7 applications from a diverse background of projects and disciplines and commends all the applicants on their proposed research or teaching projects. We are pleased to announce the 2022-2023 winners in no particular order:

 

Project: Intercultural Engagement in Short-Term Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs Across Disciplines

Led by Professor Priya Ananth, MTSU Department of World Languages & Cultures

Project runs July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2023

 

Project: Matlab/ Simulink simulations for an autonomous vehicle sensors testbed

Led by Professor Jorge Vargas, MTSU Department of Engineering Technology

Project runs July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2023

 

Project: Database of American Synagogue Iconography (DASI)

Led by Professor Laura Cochrane, MTSU Department of Art & Design

Project runs July 1, 2022 through June 30, 2023

 

Project: The African American Material Culture of Death in Middle Tennessee

Led by Professor Stacey Graham, MTSU Department of History

Project runs August 1, 2022 through July 30, 2023

 

Congratulations to the winners. Check back later to see project news updates. To read about the next cycle for proposals or to see other Digital Seed Grants awarded, visit the Digital Seed Grant page.

Posted on 8/12/2022

Announcing the Final Projects for the Digital Seed Grants 2020-2021

Announcing the Final Projects for the Digital Seed Grants 2020-2021

The Digital Seed Grant (dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant) had impressive applications for its fourth year (award period 2020-2021), which initially launched in 2016 for the award period of 2017-2018. The Digital Seed Grant Review Committee and Library Dean decided to award two grants for the 2020-2021 academic year and extended this into 2022 to help projects impacted by Covid. The AY 20-21 awardees were announced on the website at https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant20-21. A PDF copy of this announcement is preserved in the institutional repository (access the PDF by clicking view/open).

 

Hidden Town in 3D Website

Primary Investigator (PI):  Dr. Molly Taylor-Poleskey, Department of History

PI’s Project Description: This grant enabled the web presence, https://HiddenTown3D.org, for a multi-year, collaborative project of a digital reconstruction of a slave dwelling that no longer exists physically. It is a platform for scholarly and public engagement and builds awareness about the role of museums in considering the impacts of racism on the public understanding of American history. The seed grant covered the wages of a PhD Candidate to create the webpage with a SquareSpace template and populate it with our images, essays, and links to 3D models in SketchFab.

Purpose and Audience: This project launched a website to present 3D animations and scholarly essays for the project, "Hidden Town in 3D." Hidden Town in 3D virtually presents the home and speculated possessions of Christian David, an enslaved man who lived and worked in the Moravian community of Salem, North Carolina in the 19th century. Public History students researched and composed essays explaining their curatorial choices in building and furnishing David's dwelling, which was not preserved with the dwellings of white enslavers when the Old Salem Museum was created in the 1950s.

This website and its 3D animations are the result of a partnership between Old Salem Museum and Gardens in North Carolina and the Animation and Digital History Programs at MTSU. The idea came from the museum’s attempts to recover and represent the stories of the African Americans who lived in the village in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Until the last decade, the museum has focused primarily on the stories and artifacts of the town’s white inhabitants. This project advances new understandings of the nature of race in southern town life through virtual reality, affording the public to perceive historic Salem in a way that is not possible in the current physical landscape.

With the website enabled by the Walker Library Digital Seed Grant, we are now able to share our research and models with a broad audience of scholars, students, and museum visitors. We are currently using the launch of the website as an opportunity to progress to the next phase of the project by asking for feedback through emails to prominent scholars of the interpretation of slavery at American museums. The next phase of the project is to apply for external grants for an on-site iteration of the virtual Christian David house at Old Salem Museums and Gardens. On one unsuccessful National Endowment for the Humanities grant application, two reviewers noted the need for this website to clarify the purpose of the project. HiddenTown3D.org brings all our work together in a succinct, yet informative platform. Website visitors can customize their visit to delve as deeply as they choose into the details of the reconstructions and how they are made.

Project News:

MTSU history, animation students break 3D ground on 19th-century ‘Hidden Town.’ MTSU News article written by Gina Logue on May 15, 2018. https://mtsunews.com/mtsu-old-salem-project-summer2018/

image of 3d buildling

 

Studio Art Teaching Resources

Primary Investigator (PI):  Professor Mark Mcleod, Department of Art and Design

PI’s Project Description: The Digital Seed Grant proposal was submitted to encourage collaboration among Art and Design Foundations faculty through the creation of a website for studio art resources. As part of the Digital Seed Grant that was awarded in September 2020, an email was sent to fellow faculty in the Art and Design Department requesting sample studio assignments and other resources. The resources that were submitted included assignments and assessment measures which are not only invaluable to new faculty that may not have much teaching experience but also beneficial to seasoned faculty members in the ongoing development of their course curriculum. Because of the collection of these resources, studio art faculty now have access to each other’s curricular content and can adjust their own assignments to better align with the learning objectives for foundational courses in Studio Art.

Purpose and Audience: During that first call in September, five colleagues responded with a total of 100 assignments. These 100 assignments were then edited by the grant-funded student worker for clarity and duplications were removed. This editing left us with 25 Drawing (ART 1620 and 1640), 25 Two-Dimensional Design (ART 1610), 18 Three-Dimensional Design (ART 1630), and 13 Digital Foundations (ART 1650) assignments. Although the Foundations faculty meet regularly to discuss the development of our area, I believe that this is the first time that assignments were gathered and shared so broadly. In addition to these 81 assignments other resources such as rubrics, student guidelines for documenting artwork, and course content were also shared.

The grant-loaned equipment included a scanner, digital cameras, and lighting kits. The ongoing pandemic and the continued implementation of remote courses made in-person collaboration with colleagues difficult. We were, however, able to train our current work-study students to use the equipment to document student work. They set up a drop-off table outside of the student gallery space where students and faculty could submit work to be documented. This went surprisingly well and is something we might implement going forward. As things start to return to normal the equipment should see more frequent use.

Through ongoing website maintenance and the inclusion of an assignment submission page, the website is anticipated to continue growing in both content quantity and quality. Encouraging faculty to use the resources provided and to contribute their innovative teaching ideas should improve both student learning experiences and the student’s ability to demonstrate proficiency in learning objectives.

Project News:

The assignments and other resources are viewable on the web at https://studioartteachingresources.com. Instructors can even contribute with the Submit Assignment option on the website.

image of example resources

 

Funding and Support

The Digital Seed Grant is made possible by generous funding and support from the Library Dean and the Digital Scholarship Initiatives team. For many, this is a starter grant, which can lead to national grant opportunities in the future and Walker Library wants to encourage and support such creativity activity.

As a competitive grant, evaluation of applications and assessment of digital lifecycles of selected projects takes time. The Digital Seed Grant is indebted to the time of the Review Committee, comprised of digital project experts from Walker Library and the Digital Partners (a rotating member from the Department of History, Center for Historic Preservation, Center for Popular Music, Albert Gore Research Center, and the University Archives). The Walker Library also thanks those that help promote the grant and encourage participation. Since 2017, the library has jumped-started campus research by funding 15 digital seed grant projects across various academic disciplines.

 

The 2021-2022 call for proposals closed; and those projects recently concluded on June 30, 2022. As those projects are finalized, the following website will be updated: https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant21-22.

The 2022-2023 call for proposals will closed, and those projects are running from July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2022. As those projects are completed, the following website will be updated: https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant22-23.

For more information on the Digital Seed Grant and access the application, visit https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant.

Posted on 8/2/2022

We're Hiring: Digital Publishing Manager applications due 7/29/22

We have re-posted a new position! Consider the position of Manager, Digital Publishing at MTSU's Walker Library's Digital Scholarship Initiatives (DSI) unit. The Digital Publishing Manager (DPM) manages established and forthcoming production services for open access publishing and digital archiving in the library, including e-journal and e-book hosting platforms such as OJS, PressBooks, print-on-demand services, and others through effective project management, production workflow, and user support. The application closes on 7/29/22, and the job details are below.

More about Middle Tennessee State University: As a Carnegie doctoral high research institution (R2), with an ethnically diverse student body of nearly 22,000, MTSU is the No. 1 producer of graduates for the Greater Nashville economy, has been named among Princeton Review's list of the Best 385 Colleges in the U.S. three years in a row, and is also the top destination for first generation, adult learning, and transfer students in Tennessee.

For information about MTSU, Walker Library and Rutherford County, see the Hiring Resources section at https://library.mtsu.edu/about/jobs.

For more information about the Library’s DSI unit and its core values visit https://dsi.mtsu.edu/coreprinciples.

Application Review Date: July 29, 2022

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CFP Now Open: Digital Seed Grants 2022-2023

Announcing the call for Digital Seed Grants

The Digital Seed Grant competition for 2022-2023 is now open. Walker Library Digital Scholarship Initiatives invites proposals for seed grants to support individual or collaborative digital scholarship projects in research, teaching, or public outreach from any discipline or area at MTSU. The call for proposals (CFP) is open to MTSU faculty, staff, researchers and graduate students pursing digital scholarship projects (from the arts to sciences and everything in between). Projects run from July 1 to June 30. Applications for the 2022-2023 cycle are due April 18, 2022.

 

Examples of digital projects, past winners, and application guidelines are available at https://dsi.mtsu.edu/dsgrant.

 

Seed Grants (up to $2,000)

The number of grants available each year will vary, with each at a maximum of $2,000. A list of the awarded projects are available by year: 2021-2022, 2020-2021, 2019-2020, 2018-2019 and 2017-2018.

Example Uses of Seed Grant

·  Hiring a student worker to perform data collection or analysis, text encoding, or data entry*

·  Digitizing materials not held at Walker Library

·  Purchasing specialized equipment for digitization or analysis

·  Digital textbook, edition, archive or exhibit

·  Media-rich narratives or interactive storytelling

·  Use of games, 3D, AR/VR, or maker projects for research or teaching

·  Applying geospatial methods to literary texts, historical problems, or scientific discoveries

·  Textual, network, audio, or visual analysis

·  Pedagogical focus on civic or public humanities

 

Call for Proposals—Book Chapters--deadline extended to Feb 7!

Working book title: Privacy and Safety in Remote Learning Environments  

Proposal submission deadline extended: February 7, 2022 

Interdisciplinary perspectives are highly encouraged 

Overview 

Online education is not a new phenomenon, but the Covid-19 pandemic caused a sudden and widespread shift online for many K-12 schools and higher education institutions that had little prior experience with it. Even as schools return to in-person classes, online platforms remain prevalent as backup and supplemental content delivery tools. While privacy issues related to education are not new, the sudden shift to online learning brought these concerns into sharp focus for many parents, educators, administrators, and researchers. 

The objective of this book is to reflect on the unintended breaches of privacy, safety, and security that occurred during the rush to move classes online, and to examine and propose solutions for more responsible future use of the platforms.

This book will document how educational institutions approach privacy regarding students and educators, describe privacy initiatives implemented in response to online learning, and contribute to the growing discussion of how privacy and surveillance impact our users, especially students from our most vulnerable populations. 

We encourage a broad range of contributions, including original research, case studies, pedagogical approaches, and critical reflection papers. We especially encourage contributions from K-12 and higher education educators, research centers, museums, and libraries that facilitate online learning or online curriculum, and from underrepresented and historically marginalized racial, social, and/or class groups. Interdisciplinary perspectives are highly encouraged. 

Topics may include but are not limited to: 

  • Privacy policies of 3rd party EdTech platforms (Google Classroom, Microsoft Teams, Schoology, etc) 
  • Parental “spying” and classroom privacy 
  • Family privacy and synchronous online schooling 
  • Online harassment among students (private chats, doxing, social media, etc) 
  • Cameras in student private spaces  
  • Surveillance of student online activities 
  • Exam proctoring software and privacy concerns  
  • Personally Identifiable Information in online learning systems and susceptibility to cybercriminals  
  • Privacy, storage, and deletion policies for recordings and data 
  • Handling data removal requests from students  
  • Appointing a privacy expert in schools, universities, or districts 
  • How and why to perform security/privacy audits 
  • Student attitudes about online privacy 
  • Instructor privacy/safety concerns 
  • Libraries: privacy policies of ebook platforms 
  • Libraries: online reference services and transcripts 
  • Identity authentication best practices 
  • Learning analytics and “big data” in higher education  

Submission Procedures: 

Potential contributors are invited to submit proposals of not more than 500 words for chapters of 3,000-5,000 words (not including tables/figures and references). All submitted chapters will be reviewed by at least two peer-reviewers on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project. Inquiries should be sent to the editors and proposals submitted via the submission form (link below). 

Tentative timeline- (adjusted for deadline extension): 

February 7, 2022 / Chapter proposals due

February 21, 2022 / Authors notified

May 21, 2022 / Final chapters due

July 10, 2022 / Post peer-review, final edits from editors/authors due

Fall 2022 / Book published 

Submission form at https://mtsu.libwizard.com/f/BookCFP2022 (extended deadline of 2/7/2022) 

About the Book 

The book is published by Digital Scholarship Initiatives (DSI) at the James E. Walker Library, Middle Tennessee State University. DSI has been publishing peer-reviewed journals and hosting scholarly and creative works at MTSU since 2014. The book has no submission nor acceptance fees for manuscripts and will be published open access (free to read online), while also available as a print-on-demand option. Chapter contributions are published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license (CC BY-NC 4.0).

About the Editors  

Denise Quintel (denise.quintel@mtsu.edu) and Amy York (Amy.York@mtsu.edu) are faculty librarians at the James E. Walker Library at Middle Tennessee State University. Collectively, the editors have a wide range of experience in web services and instructional technology. Please contact them with any questions.  

Printable copy of the CFP (PDF)

 

We’re Hiring: Graduate Assistant for spring 2022

MTSU Walker Library is hiring a graduate assistant (GA) for spring 2022. The GA will be able to expand their own knowledge of technology and library services and gain on-the-job training in the design, digitization and/or management of digital projects. Specific projects vary by semester (see the Job Description for details). The position comes with a stipend and tuition waiver. **Must be currently enrolled as a graduate student at MTSU in order to apply. Submit your application with your MTSU email (not personal email)**

There is no specific skill or experience required, we encourage anyone with an interest to apply.

Please see the attached description below and follow instructions to apply by October 18, 2021.

(10/20/21 update: The application cycle is now closed)

 

New Journal Issues Published

Scholarly journals hosted with MTSU's Walker Library have newly published volumes for spring and summer 2020. The following journal issues are now available online:

 

Volume 5, Issue 1 of the International Journal of the Whole Child was published on April 24, 2020.

The journal is edited by Dr. Tiffany Wilson (Middle Tennessee State University) and Dr. Sandra J. Stone (Northern Arizona University).

 

Volume 30, Number 1 of the Journal of Small Business Strategy was published on May 27, 2020.

The journal is edited by Dr. William McDowell (Bradley University) and Dr. Michael L. Harris (East Carolina University).

 

Volume 20, Number 1 of the Journal for Economic Educators was published on June 19, 2020.

The journal is edited by Dr. Michael Roach (Middle Tennessee State University).

 

Walker Library offers free journal hosting services to members of the Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) community. All of the journals we service are digital and open access (free to read online). Walker Library established this journal hosting program to meet the needs and support the mission, values and vision of the university. To see more journals published at MTSU or learn how to publish a journal at Walker Library visit https://libjournals.mtsu.edu.

Publication: Digital Scholarship Initiatives Highlights 20/21

Announcing the recently published Digital Scholarship Initiatives Highlights 2020-2021: A Digital Scholarship Center Assessment

 

The 7th annual DSI Highlights brochure summarizes the past year's development (2020-2021). The brochure highlights initiatives lead by the MTSU Walker Library for the creation, access, dissemination, and preservation of digital and scholarly initiatives. Digital Scholarship Initiatives (DSI) Programs include opportunities to:

  • learn and share digital tools and methodologies

  • create and preserve university scholarship

  • fund research and teaching opportunities through seed grants

  • encourage and support development of digital projects

  • provide and support open access publishing

 

A pdf copy of the double-sided brochure is available at https://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/handle/mtsu/6492 (click View/Open).

A visual gallery of the brochure pages can be scrolled at https://library.mtsu.edu/digitalscholarship/highlights

 

 

More information:

 

Digital Scholarship Initiatives began at Walker Library several years ago as a way to build out the library’s collections digitally. More recently, other initiatives have been added including library publishing through JEWLScholar and Journal Hosting services; the creation of a collaborative Digital Partners group; and a Digital Scholarship Lab (DSL) dedicated to faculty and advanced students who enhance research by using digital tools and methodologies learned in workshops, collaborating on digital projects, and disseminating research through digital platforms.

 

All DSI publications, including previous years of the Highlights brochures are available at https://jewlscholar.mtsu.edu/handle/mtsu/4357

Digital Seed Grants 2021-2022 Awarded

Over summer 2021, the Digital Seed Grant Committee received applications for its fifth year of awarding Digital Seed Grants. The proposals received were of high quality despite the impact of Covid-19, Walker Library is committed to keeping the library’s charge of accelerating teaching and research with digital technologies and methodologies. One way the library does this is by funding seed grants.

The Digital Seed Grant Committee was exited to receive 12 applications from a diverse background of projects and disciplines and commends all the applicants on their proposed research or teaching projects. We are pleased to announce the 2021-2022 winners in no particular order:

Project: Revisiting the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) with Computerized Linguistic Analysis

Led by Ms. Cindi Brown, MTSU graduate student in the Department of Psychology

Project runs July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022

See the final projects page for updates and details.

 

Project: Voices From the Amazon: Translating Three Brazilian Films

Led by Professor Paul Chilsen, MTSU Department of Media Arts

Project runs July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022

See the final projects page for updates and details.

 

Project: Tissue Culture of American Ginseng

Led by Mr. Ethan Swiggart, MTSU Department of Agriculture

Project runs July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022

See the final projects page for updates and details.

 

Congratulations to the winners. Check back later to see project news updates. To read about the next cycle for proposals or to see other Digital Seed Grants awarded, visit the Digital Seed Grant page.

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